July 6, 2022

In case you haven’t noticed, the role of technology has changed quite a bit in the last 20 years or so. Slowly but surely, computers have permeated nearly every part of our lives, from what we buy, to how we get from place to place, to how we work, to where we eat after we clock out for the day.

For this reason and many others, coding is one of the most valuable skills you can build. Whether you want to advance your career, build software or games for your friends, or just understand the tech space better than before, learning the language of computers can be a major asset to your professional and personal development.

However, it can also be very intimidating. Before even writing my first program, I thought that computer programmers were an elite group of experts with talent beyond anything I could possess. From conversations I’ve had with aspiring programmers, this seems to be a common mindset — coding is a practice reserved for only the most prodigious tech whiz.

I want to make it clear up front that this isn’t true. With time, dedication, and internet access, anyone can learn to code. If you’re reading this, that includes you.

Depending on what you want to learn and how deep you want to go, you could spend a few months to the rest of your life learning, but everyone starts with the basics. That’s why, in this guide, we’ll unpack everything you need to know to get started writing code, including:

Free Resource: Website Optimization Checklist
[Download Now]

Why Learn to Code?

Before diving into your first lesson, first consider why you want to code in the first place. This will help you determine which language you decide to learn first, what sorts of projects you want to complete, and ultimately what you want to make of your skills. Here are some well-known benefits:

You’ll build professional skills.

Let’s get the most obvious out of the way: Knowledge of computer programming is a valuable employment asset. As technology continues to weave into our daily lives, coding skills will become more desired among candidates — according to job board Indeed.com, several of the most in-demand skills fall under computing.

If you’re looking to make a career pivot into tech or to switch to a more technical role within your field, knowing at least one relevant programming language is a must. This doesn’t just apply to developers, though. Web designers should know HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. Project managers sh

In case you haven’t noticed, the role of technology has changed quite a bit in the last 20 years or so. Slowly but surely, computers have permeated nearly every part of our lives, from what we buy, to how we get from place to place, to how we work, to where we eat after we clock out for the day.

For this reason and many others, coding is one of the most valuable skills you can build. Whether you want to advance your career, build software or games for your friends, or just understand the tech space better than before, learning the language of computers can be a major asset to your professional and personal development.

However, it can also be very intimidating. Before even writing my first program, I thought that computer programmers were an elite group of experts with talent beyond anything I could possess. From conversations I’ve had with aspiring programmers, this seems to be a common mindset — coding is a practice reserved for only the most prodigious tech whiz.

I want to make it clear up front that this isn’t true. With time, dedication, and internet access, anyone can learn to code. If you’re reading this, that includes you.

Depending on what you want to learn and how deep you want to go, you could spend a few months to the rest of your life learning, but everyone starts with the basics. That’s why, in this guide, we’ll unpack everything you need to know to get started writing code, including:

Free Resource: Website Optimization Checklist
[Download Now]

Why Learn to Code?

Before diving into your first lesson, first consider why you want to code in the first place. This will help you determine which language you decide to learn first, what sorts of projects you want to complete, and ultimately what you want to make of your skills. Here are some well-known benefits:

You’ll build professional skills.

Let’s get the most obvious out of the way: Knowledge of computer programming is a valuable employment asset. As technology continues to weave into our daily lives, coding skills will become more desired among candidates — according to job board Indeed.com, several of the most in-demand skills fall under computing.

If you’re looking to make a career pivot into tech or to switch to a more technical role within your field, knowing at least one relevant programming language is a must. This doesn’t just apply to developers, though. Web designers should know HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. Project managers sh

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